Batteries

Some household batteries may contain toxic metals such as mercury, lead, cadmium, nickel, and silver which can contaminate our air and water when the batteries are incinerated, landfilled or improperly disposed of. For more information on batteries visit the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. Source: MPCA “Household batteries”

Reduce: Buy equipment that can be plugged into an outlet.

Reuse: Buy rechargeable batteries, these batteries can be recharged up to 1,000 times before a recycling facility takes them apart and their metals are recovered. All rechargeable batteries must be taken to the Household Hazardous Waste Facility in Fergus Falls or a HHW mobile collection.

Recycle: Once a battery is used up or no longer useful, the battery’s chemistry will determine how best to dispose of it. Look on the battery’s label or packaging to identify what it is made of and to identify the safe disposal method. Is it a lithium or alkaline battery? In Minnesota, it is against the law to throw rechargeable batteries in the trash.

ALKALINE: can be found in alarm clocks, calculators, flashlights, TV remote controls, and remote control toys.
Found in sizes: A, AA, AA, C, D, N, 9-volt and lantern.

Disposal Information: It is ok to throw alkaline batteries in your garbage. Due to concerns about mercury, battery producers have voluntarily eliminated mercury from alkaline batteries since 1993.

RECHARGEABLE: Commonly found in cordless power tools, cordless phones, cellphones, laptops, tablets digital cameras, wireless keyboards, small electronics and other products.

Disposal Information: Rechargeable batteries can be dropped off free of charge at the Household Hazardous Waste Facility in Fergus Falls.

LITHIUM: Can be found in smoke detectors, medical device and other products.

Disposal Information: Lithium batteries may be reactive. Place each in a separate plastic bag or place non-conductive (electrical) tape over the battery terminals. Lithium batteries can be dropped off free of charge at the Household Hazardous Waste Facility in Fergus Falls.
BUTTON: Commonly found in watches, car keyless entry remotes, hearing aids, medical devices, calculators.

Disposal Information: Do not throw button batteries in the trash. Take them to the Household Hazardous Waste Facility in Fergus Falls to properly dispose of them free of charge.

AUTOMOTIVE/RECREATIONAL: These batteries are found in cars, motorcycles, boats, and snowmobiles.

Disposal Information: Return to the retailer or they can be taken to a local transfer station. By law, auto battery retailers must accept up to five lead-acid batteries from consumers free of charge. You may dispose of car, truck, boat, motorcycle, tractor and commercial batteries at a local transfer station for a fee. For more information on motor vehicle batteries visit the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency.

Download this document


Was this page helpful for you? Yes No